FAQ’s About Holy Week

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Why is Holy Week So Important?
Holy Week is important because it commemorates the events of Christ’s final days and passion. This includes the institution of the Eucharist and the crucifixion. Obviously, Christ’s institution of the Eucharist and his passion and death are important in many ways, especially in terms of their importance in the reconciliation of God and humanity (the atonement). Holy Week commemorates these important events, and is therefore a very busy time in the life of the Church. For an article explaining why Catholics spend so much time at church during Holy Week, check out You’re at Church A Lot During Holy Week…How Strange.

2. Why Doesn’t My Church Observe Holy Week?
There are various possibilities. Perhaps your particular church considers Holy Week to be unbiblical (although the whole week is based explicitly on Scripture). Some denominations that came out of the “Radical Reformation” got rid of the Church Year, believing it to be a manmade tradition. Another possibility is that your church believes Holy Week is outdated and places too much emphasis on sin and guilt. A final reason may be that your pastor is not familiar with the rich meaning behind Holy Week, which means you should send him to this site.

3. What are the Western Catholic Fast Guidelines for Good Friday?
Fasting means eating only one full meatless (no animal flesh) meal on this day. However, one may still eat a breakfast and even a lunch in addition to a full meal if the two additional small meals do not add up to a second full meal. Snacking is not allowed. Drinking coffee, tea, juices, etc, between meals is permitted on fast days. The requirements are slightly different for those of certain ages. Fasting is only required of those from ages 18-59, although parents are expected to teach their children the reasons behind their fasting, etc. Those with health conditions are excluded. Note that some Western Bishop Conferences, Eastern Catholic Rites, and Orthodox Christians have different fasting guidelines, so it is wise to check with your local parish about expectations. These are simply the minimum expectations. Additional forms of self-denial, within reason, can also be spiritually beneficial.

4. What is the Paschal Triduum?
The Paschal Triduum, often called the Easter Triduum or simply the Triduum, consists of Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday. This includes the Great Easter Vigil, the high point of the Triduum. The word Triduum comes from the Latin word meaning “three days.” It begins the evening of Maundy Thursday and ends at Evening Prayer on Easter Sunday. Thus the Triduum consists of three full days which begin and end in the evening. The Triduum is not part of Lent (at least liturgically), but Holy Thursday and Good Friday are still reckoned as part of the traditional forty days of Lent. The Triduum celebrates the heart of our faith and salvation: the death and resurrection of Christ, and is thus the high point of the liturgical year.

adapted from: Churchyear

 
 

Leave a Reply

 

Resources

Hi dear friends and visitors!! thanks for visiting me here!! Have a great and blessed day!!




WANT TO EXCHANGE LINK WITH ME? READ HERE FIRST

Extras

All photographs used on this site, including thumbnails, are the Author's property and are ©copyright. Please do not use our photos without our permission. If you wish to use one of our photos on your personal website or blog, please send us the link to the page where it is being used and the photo must be linked back to this site. We hope that you respect the Authors' request. Thank you for your respect and understanding!

Copyright © 2013 My Daily Nourishment | All Rights Reserved

Blog Design by Simple Blog MakeOver